Мир Согласно Мне

Idea of a study. #1

I have an idea of making the following study: copy ingredients and nutritional facts from popular products prior their acquisition by big transnational companies and see how they change the formula once the reins are in their hands. I have a gut feeling that they do change it, using cheaper equivalents to drive down the cost of production and skimming fat margins in the process….hapless us barely noticing we've been dumbfounded for the umpteenth time 🙁

Интереснейшее открытие по цветовосприятию среди народов

Из книги the Talking Hands.Она о языках глухонемых в общем и об одной интересной деревне с повышенной частотой случаев глухонемоты в частности. вот там я наткнулся на такой интереснейший эпизод:

…As the researchers sifted the data, a pattern began to emerge. They found no languages that contained just a single color word, but they did find several that had only two: these literally translate as  “black” (used to describe all dark, dull and cool hues, including green and blue) and “white” (used for light, bright and warm ones: red, orange, yellow, pink and the like). This doesn’t mean that speakers of these languages fail to recognize red or yellow or blue when they see them. It’s simply that they reply on just two umbrella terms to namethem. In Lower Valley Hitigima, for instance, all light or brown colors (including white, yellow and reds) are referred to as mola, “white”; all dark or dull ones (including black, greens and blues) are muli, “black”.

On the basis of these color inventories, the researchers sorted the world’s spoken languages into seven different groups, or “stages”: (I) languages, like Lower Valley Hitigima, with only two color terms; (II) languages with three terms’ (III) those with four terms; (IV) those with five terms: (V) those with six terms: (VI) those with seven terms; (VII) those, like English, with eight or more terms. The languages of traditional societies, they found, tended to have fewer basic color terms, while those of industrialized societies have more.

But the most striking discovery was this: across the globe, the number of basic color terms a language has is intimately tied to whichcolors those are. If a language has two color terms, they are always “black” (which includes greens and blues) and “white” (including reds, oranges and yellows). If it has three terms, they are always “black”, “white” and “red” (where red may describe reddish, yellowish or brownish hues). Languages with four basic color terms include the preceding three plus either “yellow” or a generic term that takes in both green and blue (the researches call this “grue”), Languages with five color terms contain “black”, “white” and “red” plus “yellow” and “grue”. In languages with six terms, “grue” has split into the differentiated words “green” and “blue”. To this list, languages with seven terms always add “brown”. Finally, the languages with eight terms and up, a group that includes most of the languages of modern industrial countries, will add one or more words from the list “purple”, “pink”, “orange” and “gray”. English, with eleven terms, has all of these. So do Spanish, Hebrew, Japanese, Hungarian and a number of other languages.

“Our results,” the researchers wrote, “cast doubt on the commonly held belief that each language segments the…color continuum arbitrarily and independently of each other language. It appears now that although different languages encode in their vocabularies different numbers of basic color categories, a total universal inventory of exactly eleven basic color categories exists, from which the eleven or fewer basic color terms of any given language are drawn.”

Российские и советские безалкогольные напитки Russian and Soviet soft drinks Part 2


Привет! Вот в продолжении темы "Об этом не пишут в учебниках русского для иностранцев и в разговорниках" сделал видео о популярных российских безалкогольных напитках. Молочка последует 🙂

Hi! In continuation to the "They don't talk about this in Russian as foreign textbooks and phrasebooks" topic I have created a video on popular Russian non-alcohol drinks. Diary products to follow soon 🙂

Российские и советские безалкогольные напитки Russian and Soviet soft drinks Part 1

Привет! Вот в продолжении темы "Об этом не пишут в учебниках русского для иностранцев и в разговорниках" сделал видео о популярных российских безалкогольных напитках. Молочка последует 🙂

Hi! In continuation to the "They don't talk about this in Russian as foreign textbooks and phrasebooks" topic I have created a video on popular Russian non-alcohol drinks. Diary products to follow soon 🙂

На полях карты российской блогосферы

http://www.chaskor.ru/article/na_polyah_karty_rossijskoj_blogosfery_22121

Московский Твит

http://www.chaskor.ru/article/moskovskij_tvit_25553

RSA Animate — Changing Education Paradigms


Awesome!

Американский студенческий спорт — еще один пробел в нашем понимании пал. Заодно и миф.

Я, как и многие, со скепсисом относился к "студентам", участвующим в мегапопулярных в США студенческих чемпионатах по американскому футболу и баскетболу под эгидой NCAA. Однако, по крайней мере формально, к их академической успеваемости предъявляются вполне реальные и прописанные требования:
Пара абзацев на английском о критериях…

The Flutie Effect Эффект Флюти

Читаю по диагонали книгу Sports: Why People Love Them! Наткнулся на интересный феномен "Эффект Флюти". В двух словах — успехи университетов в студенческих чемпионатах приводят к последующему всплеску в абитуриентах.

Вот подробное описание:

Мои отзывы на книги. Часть 1. My book reviews. Part 1.

Эти отзывы я, в основном, оставлял на Amazon.com и Goodreads.com Решил просто перепостить тут -ведь вам, наверное, интересно узнать книги, которые я оценил на 5 баллов 🙂

The Ape and the Sushi Master: Cultural Reflections of a Primatologist  by Franz De Waal^

Highly informative, insightful and enlightening to anyone interested in human nature. A very humbling yet thought provoking account of how much of this intangible matter — morals — we share with primates. You will also learn that a tremendously big part of our individual and collective behavior apparently started in apes. It robs us of our perceived uniqueness, but simultaneously enriches us with a widened realization of a bigger and more complex picture. And this is just a tiny sliver of many other wonderful revelations that are kept for your in store in this treasure trove of a book! A must read.

Moscow 1941: A City and Its People at War by Rodric Braithwaite

Overall an excellent effort! Bravo! I read criticisms by those who rated the book low and found that they contradict each other: one thinks it’s shallow, another — too detailed, one lacks personal accounts, another complains about their unnecessary abundance.

My humble Muscovite’s impression is that it is a well-balanced take on the extremely important, but bitterly disputed matter. The author doesn’t just through you into the midst of the battle for the last 100 miles to the city, but first he sets stage, which helps to get a bigger picture. It’s impossible to understand the battle without knowing that much (or that little, If you wish) of background facts and processes, you are reading about the larger-than-life clash of two very unique states. You need to go back to the events happened as early as 1905 Russian Revolution and tell about recent archive discoveries of Post-Communist 1990-es.

Personal narratives from people from all layers of society serve an essential tool too. They add depths, and human touch, because emotions and feelings there are timeless and easy to relate to. Without them the narrative could turn into dry enumeration of divisions, pieces of artillery, types of tanks and kilometers trudged through. I think if you look for that kind of story you better turn to one of Osprey’s books.

I am impressed by how a Western author treats the material. His tone is respectful and attentive. Here and there he gives a legendary glossed version of a fact (a one we were taught in Soviet schools) and then recites recent attempts to debunk it, making the book interesting even to Russian readers. He doesn’t try to sensationalize though. His summation of the story of tortured Zoya Kosmodemyanskaya, who was made an icon in the USSR is indicative:
«In all the confusion and rumour-mongering, however, one thing remained beyond doubt. A young girl did die gallantly, though perhaps pointlessly, at the hands of the Germans».

What I found even more valuable is his appropriate cross-comparison snippets of British experience of similar ordeals: The London Blitz, rationing, wartime losses etc. When put in perspective, it all helps to grasp the magnitude of what was happening in those months. It also shows that many weird and sometimes brutal measures were echoed by or firstly introduced by similar or comparable actions in Great Britain (like requisition of domestic pigeons). This helps to demonstrate that it’s not Russians, who were quirky, but the time itself called for abnormal and sometimes illogical (by peacetime standards) actions.

P.s. Believe it or not, but Mr. Zeldin mentioned in the book as a promising young actor of «The Swinemaiden and The Shepherd» still acts at 96.